Monday, January 15, 2007

OH, HORRORS! I MISSED THE SERMON AGAIN!



So, what was I actually doing on Sunday? Readers, you guessed it, I was watching my favorite lesbians on T.V. See the promo shot for the third season of this thrilling Showtime series below:



The show airs at 9pm from now until the middle of April. This show is my one pop culture indulgence, and I watch it religiously. The first season of The L Word started in 2004 and was unlike anything on television before. The show centers on a beautiful cast of women with fabulous careers who live in L.A. The show documents the lives of these young women as they discover themselves through their relationships with other women. (Not all the characters on the show are lesbians, some are bisexual, Trans- gendered, all colors of the rainbow are represented.) See below the beginning credits from the show:



Sexy, eh?

As one can imagine the show attracts a wide variety of viewers from the “foaming at the mouth because I love lesbians” straight-boys to the gayest of the gay, the L Word has a lot of appeal for many reasons. I, personally, wouldn’t mind being a high-powered lesbian who lives in L.A. with a gang of hot friends. What a life!

The show’s time line, oddly enough, moved right along with my own blossoming sexuality. During 2004, I began a series of intense relationships (both friendships and romantic) with other lesbian women. At the time, I was strictly involved with women only and was not considering romantic relationships with men. Although women are preferred, occasionally now I will date men too. During the course of my sexual self-discovery, the question of identity and sexuality plagued me indefinitely.

Is sexuality just part of our identity? Or does our sexuality define our identity? Among those who follow social norms, gender roles, and tradition I believe it does. For example, what would happen to good ol’ Bob down the street who has 3 kids, a wife, and respectable job if he was outed publicly against his will? Does his identity cave in? Does he form new identity as a result of being forced “out of the closet?” Does he then form a “new” identity within the gay community? Interesting questions indeed.

Bisexuals, on the other hand, straddle the middle line. Since we are neither gay or straight, the task of forming a strong identity can be daunting. It reminds me of a song by Suzanne Vega called “Left of Center” where she states: “If you want me, you can find me, left of center, off of the strip.”

There are advantages to living on the fringes as the view sure is nice from the outside. From here, you can see almost everyone-I mean, everything, as a potential possibility. But as a good friend of mine would say, “Come on Sally S, now isn’t the time to be gettin’ greedy on me.” Although I relish the display, I’d better keep my hands to myself.

1 comment:

Marti Abernathey said...

"Is sexuality just part of our identity? Or does our sexuality define our identity? Among those who follow social norms, gender roles, and tradition I believe it does."

For newbs, right out of the closet, that's true. But I think many queer folk find their way back to an identity that matches their old identity, as much as it is accepted in their social circle.

"Bisexuals, on the other hand, straddle the middle line. Since we are neither gay or straight, the task of forming a strong identity can be daunting."

Pfft. You want hard? Try being a polyamorous, bisexual, transsexual!

:)

*pause for effect*

Oh, and you should have your bi union card stripped away for EVER using the "straddle" in anything to do with bisexuality. :p

Being bisexual is like at the buffet. Just because you CAN have everything, doesn't mean you should, or you will.

I'm just trying to find a life that works for me. I've gotten to a point where I'm out, but not to the point I have to be an advocate in the face of the rest of society...every single day. That gets VERY tiring.